LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...

Sunday, December 03, 2017

The Role of HR in Building a Culture of Trust

There are a number of books written to emphasize the value of trust in an organization.  Patrick Lencioni wrote “The Five Dysfunctions of a Team” where he highlighted that trust is the foundation of teamwork and that the absence of it is a dysfunction that leads to other dysfunctions.  Stephen Covey wrote the book “The Speed of Trust where he emphasized "The ability to establish, extend, and restore trust with all stakeholders – customers, business partners, investors and coworkers – is the key leadership competency of the new, global economy."  Francis Fukuyama wrote “Trust: The Social Virtues and The Creation of Prosperity” where he cited the difference between high trust and low trust cultures and how high trust culture tend to do better than low trust ones.  Despite all these information about the value of trust in an organization, many companies in the Philippines continue to struggle in building trust. The HR leaders, I believe who are at the core of organizational relationship can do something to build a high trust culture. It’s not easy, but I believe it’s doable. I believe a good HR manager can facilitate the building of a high trust relationship in the organization if they haven’t done so yet.
Source: https://readingraphics.com/book-summary-overcoming-the-five-dysfunctions-of-a-team/

What does a high trust culture look like? I believe trust manifest in the quality of communication that happen in the organization. It shows in how goals are clarified and fine-tuned via dialogues where people are encouraged to ask questions, voice out concerns and affect changes in decisions, business strategies and tactics.  When people don’t second-guess their co-workers or their bosses, they gain the confidence and comfort to do their best at work and hold themselves accountable for reciprocating the trust.

I think that Step 1 of building a high trust culture starts with HR opening shop for conversation and dialogues with employees where formal authority is set aside so no coercive influence gets in the way of clarifying directions, raising concerns and co-creating solutions and road maps.  When HR clearly advocates common good rather than protect the interest of a sector, they gain the respect of both their peers in management and the employees who depend on them to take care of their welfare.  I think that an HR Manager’s real power does not come from his or her position title or what the company policy says he or she can do but in his/her ability to build a trusting relationship with the employees.
When HR gains the trust of everyone in the organization, they get the opportunity to  spread this trust throughout the organization by facilitating collaboration, coordination and cooperation in the organization. It helps when people trust HR rather than fear them. HR gets more cooperation for its programs and because the programs succeed, the satisfaction is higher, motivation is higher, which leads to higher performance.

HR needs to be seen as more than an organizational authority, we need to be seen as leaders who can build bridges of trust that make people feel safe to be at their best when they are at work. 

In the Philippines HR Group, the country's largest Facebook Group of HR Professionals, non-HR members ask  whether their company is being fair or not. They'd rather ask the people in the group than go to their own HR Department. They say it's easier but it feels more like it's because it's safer.  If I am an HR manager, I would rather encourage co-workers to go to me to seek clarity because I can give it better than anyone else. But for that, they need to trust HR. For that to happen, HR needs to be trustworthy.

No comments:

Post a Comment

If you have an opinion about this topic or a related experience you want to share, please feel free to leave a comment but please be respectful. No bad words please or I will be constrained to delete it.