Thursday, September 19, 2013

Recruitment - What You are Missing When You Focus on Experience Before Competencies

Let me say the obvious here, experience does not always mean competence. While this is common knowledge, I don't understand why  many hiring managers opt to highlight years of experience as one of the requirements for considering a candidate. I think it's okay if we are only talking of one or two years. But when we talk about 5, 10 or 15, we miss out on people who are capable of developing competence early in their career.

I get it, we look for people with long experience because we have better chance that they've seen and went through enough. They've accomplished much to gain confidence and failed enough times to learn. But all these are presumptions that can be matched by this similar presumption: Younger, less experienced but quick learning candidates, are probably smarter, more creative, ambitious and aggressive in their career. Depending on the situation we can all be both right or wrong.

So, if we can't depend on experience and if stating long years of work as a requirement causes us to miss young but very talented candidates, what can we do? We focus on COMPETENCIES.

Many companies in other countries are beginning to describe the competencies they are looking for in their job postings. We have not reached that level of maturity yet. We still look at degrees and years of work experience. I say we start drawing the needed competencies for each position in the organization and use them to look for talent. When we do this, we both broaden and then narrow our search. We broaden it in the sense that we can start welcoming younger candidates who can prove that they have the competencies we are looking for. We narrow the search because we can already drive away those who do not have the competencies regardless of how long they've worked.

Stay tuned. In the next few days, I'm going to start sharing my experience, in helping organizations develop their competency models.

12 comments:

linda paredes said...

This simply shows EXPERIENCE is not ENOUGH! Experiences can be relevant and helpful for a time. With the advent of new technologies, experiences become passe and outdated. Look at what happened to established and experienced news papers and magazines which have been over-ridden with online mags and newspapers. Likewise COMPETENCIES need constant upgrading and sharpening - never-ending life processes.

Edwin Ebreo said...

Right you are, Ms. Linda! :)

Edwin Ebreo said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Edwin Ebreo said...

Right you are, Ms. Linda! :)

Edwin Ebreo said...

Right you are, Ms. Linda! :)

Edwin Ebreo said...

Right you are, Ms. Linda! :)

Edwin Ebreo said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Paula | Payroll Solutions said...

Great point. Most recruiters tend to think that people with experience are competent since they are experienced people have been exposed to different stuffs and it'll be an advantage to the company. BUT, the truth is more competent people are the ones who are continually wanting to grow on their craft.

Patricia Baldia said...

This is such a nice article. You have raised a valid point and I could not agree with you more.

Anonymous said...

Hi Mr. Ebreo,

I have a question for you.

Can my current employer hold my resignation because hindi pa daw kasi ako nakakahanap ng kapalit

I filed my resignation five days ago and since then my boss is asking me if I already found a replacement. I said not yet. I am just worried that he may ask me to extend my last date of employment because I haven't got a replacement to endorse my duties to.

Thanks,

Mr. Brightside

Edwin Ebreo said...

It would probably make a little bit of sense if you are the person in charge of recruitment. If not, it doesn't make any sense at all.

Anonymous said...

Hello Mr. Brightside,

Your boss' argument may be sound if your company has a policy on resignation like a one-month-before policy where resignation can only be valid after one month prior to filing it. However, if there is no policy regarding resignation, I would say your boss' is not in the position to hold you until you have found someone to replace you; and by 'someone to replace you' doesn't always mean when you find someone to take your post the boss will right away hire the person because the latter still has to be interviewed and approved by the boss. On that legal side, your boss may be violating the labor law if he keeps on insisting to hold you from resignation despite that fact that your act is a clear gesture that you don't want to be connected to the company anymore.

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