Wednesday, July 28, 2010

All Managers are HR Managers

Yes, IT Managers, Finance Managers, Operation Managers, even the CEO, in fact more so, the CEO, all of you who carry the title and responsibilities are HR managers. While organizations assign this title to a particular person, it does not remove the big responsibility of managing human resources from other managers. In my opinion, to think that HR management is the sole province of the title holder is the cause of many human resource management dilemma.

Be patient as I show you that I'm not overly stretching my imagination.

"It's an HR job" is how many managers dismiss HR-related issues that they think HR should take care of. "Let HR worry about it" is another phrase that to me looks like managers are putting too much power on the HR managers to manage the most important and most complex of all organizational resources- the people.

People are so critical to business success that managers who will engage their services should be in the thick of human resource management activities as HR planning, recruitment, training, performance management, compensation and benefits administration, policy creation, implementation and reinforcement. If these are all jobs for managers to do, what is the official HR Manager to do? They should serve as internal consultants, a support unit and strategic partner to the managers. The HR Department researches, puts together all the necessary mechanism in partnership with other managers so that they can manage their people better. I am giving emphasis on the term partnership because I believe that HR must not work alone in creating these mechanisms lest they render much of what they do useless.

It is easy to see when HR and line managers' partnership is working. Managers are trained to appreciate what those recruitment reports mean and are able to distinguish between a potentially good hire from bad ones using some of the best screening techniques used out there. The managers are thoroughly involved in identification of their employees learning needs and sees to it that the training being offered are the right ones. They also follow through on learning because they know its importance in the employees' performance success. They have complete appreciation of the performance management concept and use this to enhance employee performance. The uninitiated manager have no appreciation of the concept and sees performance appraisal activities as meaningless chores that they have to comply with because they're linked to salary adjustments. Effective managers appreciate their responsibility in championing company policies and take necessary action when these are violated. In contrast, other managers tend to mock these policies by criticizing and ignoring them.

I believe that the sooner all managers embrace their human resource management responsibility, the better it will be for them and the organization. The sooner they identify the gaps between what they know and what they should know in order to manage their human resources, the sooner it will be for the organization to address this gaps.
Building HR and Line Strategic Partnership Overview
If you need help addressing these gaps, you know who to call :)

2 comments:

Amandapanda801 said...

A lot of people don't know they have management or leadership potential. They see their personalities and don't believe they are the type of person that can manage others but I think this post is correct when it says all managers are HR managers because these are the people dealing with employers from the beginning to the end.

HRMS said...

I totally agree that all managers are HR managers, otherwise, they would not be able to do the things they need to do for their teams as a whole. They should, first and foremost, be able to uphold their team's welfares above all else, otherwise, their teams would not be performing at par with company standards.

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...